+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Doll making questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    Posts
    245

    Doll making questions

    I'm trying to start making dolls. I've decided that I probably wont get an ED even if I want to, but that doesn't mean I am giving up. I'm very interested in doll making. I will be making some dolls of my own. I already have names for them, too! I just have a few questions before I start. Since I don't have any books, I'm pretty much going in blind.


    1) Are all the different parts completely hollow? Or just the torso? Or.. what?

    2) If somebody could explain stringing the dolls for me, that would be really, really nice.



    I'm fairly sure that my first doll is just going to be baked sculpy because I don't really have access to a kiln or money for slip and mold-making materials. I hope that will work. At least for my first doll or first few of them. Eventually I would really like to upgrade to porcelain though.

    On that note, anybody know the best kind of paint to go onto sculpy?

  2. #2
    noxy's Avatar
    noxy is offline Adorned and bejeweled
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    in my shoe (Just kidding! I hate shoes)
    Posts
    1,453
    Hmm... I've attempted a couple times to make a doll in polymer clay, but as I am still only a beginner, I'll answer, and hope others will back up my answer. lol.

    1) For me, all the parts except for the hands and feet are hollow. I attached small hooks to the hands and feet before baking them so I could attach them.
    2) I never had a bjd before when I first started, so I spent my time on youtube. It was hard to find "How to make BJD" videos... however, I found some videos on how to "restring BJDs" that were very helpful to me. I don't remember the exact videos I watched, except for this one. But if you do a search for "restring BJD," you should get a few vids you can watch.

    For me, seeing how folks string up the dolls seemed a lot more helpful than a written explanation. Hope any of this helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Paducah, KY, US
    Posts
    1,286
    I usually use acrylic on sculpey. I think using acrylic matte medium helps it go on as a glaze, it leaves a pretty sheen, specially if you have sanded the surface and it's not perfect. I cannot seem to sculpt without having to sand the surface to smooth it.

    Another option is Genesis heat-set oil paints. They go on like acrylic, but they don't totally dry until they are heat set for a few minutes at 250 degrees or so. That way a layer can be locked on, glazed over, etc. The paint will still scratch off but not be so sensitive to moisture. I'm not sure the expense of these makes the benefits worth it. I just already had some so I tried it.

  4. #4
    lilithskyblu's Avatar
    lilithskyblu is offline Excruciatingly Enchanted
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,538
    I just saw a pretty neat ball jointed doll on ebay I wish I knew how to put a link in but (I don't) if you have time go see it, it's an air dry clay casting. I did a search for "asian ball jointed doll", catagory "dolls and bears" and it came up.
    The title of the auction is "Geisha ball jointed doll asian BJD ART by Maryna!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    723
    1)Hollow or not: usually hollow. Most or all of the parts. Depending on size and other parameters (material, preferences), hands and feet may not be hollow, but all of the other parts must be in order for the stringing to work.

    2)Stringing: just think of the limbs and body parts as a little line of beads or a necklace. There are little hooks attached to the wrists and ankles and the elastic runs as follows:

    -from one wrist to the other, through the fore- and arms and torso
    -from one anckle to the neck (head is also attached with a hook) and than to the other anckle

    The two loops or lines of elastic cross insite the torso.

    Marina's dolls are strung differently. She uses a far more advanced system of stringing. Little steel springs only join two pieces together, so you'd have one joining the foot and the calf, than one that joins the calf and the knee etc. This improves the doll's poseability and flexibility.

    Hope this helps

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    937
    Does Marina use springs for all the joints? I'm wondering, because I saw a diagram of Martha Armstrong Hand's stringing technique (not in her book, but in Suzanna Oroyan's book on designing dolls), and she used springs for most joints, but she used elastic from elbow to elbow (hooking the forearm springs to the elastic), and inside the body (hooking the thigh springs to the neck spring).
    I don't have a copy of Hand's book, so I don't know if that was the only method she used, and I don't know if Marina uses a different one. I vaguely remember a photo of a doll on Marina's work table with elastic coming out of her shoulders (I think it was her shoulders), so I'm wondering if that is how the dolls are strung inside.
    Hand's dolls (at least the one illustrated in Oroyan's book) don't have double jointed elbows and knees, either. I guess Marina has to use separate, tiny springs for those, too, yes? Like: wrist to elbow (one spring), elbow joint (one spring), upper arm (one spring).
    Larisa, you use springs. How do you do it? Do you use elastic inside?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    France
    Posts
    964
    Maybe the second photo in this post?

    http://www.enchanteddoll.com/blog/?cat=52

    I believe Marina had quickly strung the first resin dolls to see how they would look like but that is not permanent.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New York USA
    Posts
    505
    Yes, I am using springs too, 4 inside the arms and 4 inside the legs for one doll. To put doll together I am using elastic cord, thin one to put arms together and thick one to strung legs inside and up to the head. I am designing the special hooks for this things. And this strunging technique works very well for me.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    937
    Helene:
    Yes, that's the picture. Thank you. How did you remember that?
    Larisa:
    That is exactly how Martha Armstrong Hand strings the inside of the body. But I assume you are using two springs in each arm and in each leg, and maybe a pin on each side of the double joint? In other words: spring runs from wrist to bottom of elbow joint, and another one from the top of the elbow joint, through the top part of the arm to the shoulder? Am I seeing this right?
    I am trying to think through a doll, creeping up on making one myself, before I start the sketches.
    Thanks so much for all your help.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New York USA
    Posts
    505
    Yes Jslord your are right. Two springs on each arm and than metal hook which going inside the up torso and unite two arms together with elastic. I think Marina do the same, but I am not 100 % sure.

+ Reply to Thread

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts