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Thread: Tutorial: Body Blushing, Manicure, Pedicure

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    Tutorial: Body Blushing, Manicure, Pedicure

    Body blushing your Enchanted Doll yourself?? Yes!

    Here is why:

    1. It's FUN! Blushing your doll yourself really makes you appreciate the sculpt and the beauty of the doll even more. Afterwards you can feel proud of what you have done.

    2. You can do it! Blushing the body is no more difficult than putting on makeup on your own face. Manicure/pedicure takes more fine motor control, but you can still do it because...

    3. It's reversible! As long as you seal your doll first, you can undo any mistake. If you mess up painting a fingernail, you can just wipe it off with your finger and try again.

    4. It's temporary! No matter what master you hire to do body blushing, it will only last a short time. If you play with your doll regularly, the blushing will last 6 months to a year. If you don't touch her fingernails and don't put on shoes, a mani/pedi can last longer, but you know you want to put shoes on her.

    5. It's cheaper! Well, sort of. To buy all these supplies at the beginning might cost you $50-$200, but they will last you forever and you can use them for ALL your resin dolls and also for vinyl customization if you do that. So eventually you do save money. And why pay $$$ for blushing that will only last 6-12 months anyways?

    6. No need to ship! Nobody wants to ship their doll away, and even if you can hand-deliver the doll to the artist (lucky...) you would have to be without your doll for some days/weeks/months. Sad!

    7. It makes the doll look alive! Even amateur blushing like mine brings the doll to life! My blushing/mani/pedi has lots of flaws, but the doll still looks amazing.


    On the other hand, you might choose not to do it yourself if:
    -You have health issues (it can be very tiring and some hand steadiness is required)
    -You seriously have no time (it takes me a whole day)
    -You have enough money that you don't mind spending it on blushing, and you would rather support a hardworking artist


    I am not by any means an expert on body blushing, but I hope you will enjoy this tutorial anyways. Please feel free to post your own tips too!

    There are only three ways to cause irreversible damage to your doll when blushing:
    -you drop her
    -you don't spray her first
    -you use the wrong materials like oil based paint, oil pastels, sharpies, etc



    Here are all the supplies I gathered together for blushing Almas. I didn't end up using EVERYthing in this picture. Here is what I did use:
    -six brushes (see below)
    -Volks made ZM sealant spray UV cut - You must use a sealant made for resin dolls like MSC or ZM spray. There are a few other brands, but I am not familiar. Do you research.
    -oil-free pastels - I used light brown, light pink, and yellow. You must use OIL FREE watercolor pastels or you can stain your doll even with sealant!
    -Gloves - to protect your hand when spraying
    -Face mask - Not pictured but very important! Protect your lungs by spraying in an open area with a mask over your face and nose.
    -Tamiya gloss - For nails
    -Golden Artist Colors white paint - Highly recommended! This is extra thin airbrush paint, great brand. Regular acrylics might need to be thinned. I have tried regular acrylics and they suck in comparison to this brand of "airbrush-ready" colors. Whatever you do, do NOT use oil based paint! Use water based paint (acrylic, water colors) or you can stain your doll.
    -Golden Artist Colors retarder - Optional. Keeps paint from drying too fast.
    -Craft blade - For shaving pastels
    -Paint trays - For mixing pastels and paint. You could also use a paper plate.
    -Volks mini q tips - for removing small areas of color to get sharper lines around aureolas and fingernails. I also use these for mixing pastels in my paint tray.
    -Magic eraser - not pictured. For cleaning your doll and removing mistakes. To remove a little use it dry. To remove a lot (cleaning) use it when damp.
    -Tissues - for testing pastel colors, drying brushes, dusting off a pastel brush to change colors, wiping fingers, etc.
    -Windsor & Newton Brush Cleaner & Restorer - For cleaning brushes and removing sealant. This is like kryptonite for your blushing so be careful! It will really take it off.



    Brushes used:
    -The Army Painter, Wargamer: The Psycho - Highly Recommended! This is the tiniest brush I have found. It is much easier to paint tiny things with a tiny brush. It is seriously small. LOVE this brush. I used this for the white tips of fingernails and toenails.
    The rest of the brushes are more common, just from my local art store. Any brush of similar size and shape will work.
    -Robert Simmons White Sable 8/0 - I used this for the gloss on fingernails/toenails.
    -Princeton Artists Round 5/0 - Fluffy brush for bushing most areas (neck details, breast curves, navel). It's wet in the picture, usually it would look more fluffy and soft.
    -Princeton Artists Round 3/0 - I cut off the tips of this brush so now it is very short and stiff. I like this for adding small concentrated areas of color in a precise area, like on the fingernails and nipples. I also use this for mixing paint.
    -Robert Simmons Expression 1"/8 - Similarly, this has short stiff bristles for applying concentrated color in a precise area. Used for palms, soles of feet, backs of hands, nipples, vulva.
    -Princeton Artists Round 3 - Fluffy brush for blushing larger areas (body contours, knees, arms, etc)
    At minimum I would say you need 3 brushes: 1 extra fine brush like The Psycho, one smallish fluffy brush for general blushing, and one short stiff brush for areas with defined color.


    Remove the head so you don't damage or spray the face. It's pretty easy to do, don't worry. Just turn the large ring in her head to the side. You may want to use a ribbon to get a better grip on the ring. Thread the ribbon through the ring, wrap the ribbon ends around something strong like pliers, and use that to pull. That is safer than putting pliers in the head. The stringing is very tight, you might need a helper, especially when putting her back together at the end.

    Put the head out of range of your wild pastel maneuvers, but within sight so you can match the body blushing color to the faceup.

    First clean your doll with a damp magic eraser. I didn't do this well enough and there are a few places where the sealant didn't stick well or I didn't remove a mark well.
    I also recommend washing your hands often while blushing. This strips your hands of oils that can interfere with the sealant and keeps you from smearing pastels from your fingers on the doll.


    You MUST spray your doll with sealant. If you don't the pastels will stain your doll!!
    There are a few sealant brands you can use. I use Volks ZM spray because it is easy to order where I live and has always worked for me. Please do research before choosing a different brand, some of them are quite horrible.

    It is also very important to use proper ventilation and safety equipment when spraying your doll. Like spray paint, glues, and airborne powder (like porcelain dust), sealant sprays are bad for your lungs. Artists who do faceup and blushing often must be especially careful. Please use a face mask and spray outside in the open air. I also wear a glove on the hand near the spray because that stuff feels nasty.

    Hold the can far enough away that the spray lands in a light mist. You don't want it to go on so fast that the doll looks wet. That will make drops and ugly patterns. Instead do many coats of light mist. The weather here was very sunny and hot so the sealant dried in less than a second. I was able to do many coats at once. If the weather is cooler or damper where you are, you will need to spray a light mist, let it dry, and repeat. You need 3 or so coats before you begin. Turn the doll all around so you get every angle.

    Did you know that more than 5 tons of dust from meteorites is added to the earth's atmosphere every day? Plus there is pollen, pollutants, dirt... Once you begin blushing you will learn the sole purpose of all this dust: to land DIRECTLY on your doll as you are spraying sealant. It is inevitable that you will have dust specks. You can use a craft knife or the tip of a sewing needle to carefully scratch off just that tiny speck of dust and the sealant over it. Obviously you must be careful not to scratch the resin underneath. It's not as difficult or scary as it sounds, I promise!


    Now we get to mix colors! Use a craft blade to shave powder off the pastel sticks.


    You will probably need to mix a few colors to get the shade you want. You can see here my contour color (pinkish brown) is made of light brown, pink, and yellow. My blush color was mixed from the same colors but with much more pink.

    (continued in part 2)
    Last edited by allurose; April 4th, 2016 at 02:37 AM.
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    (Part 2)


    The color palate is up to you. I prefer slightly brown color for the overall body contouring, with pinkish brown to highlight specific areas (nipples, soles of feet, palms, knuckles, vulva). This is the same principle used when applying natural palette of makeup on your face. You use foundations in colors close to your skin color for smoothing your face color and adding contours to nose, cheeks, and eyelids. Pink colors are for your cheeks and lips.

    Depending on the look you want for your doll, you might use very different colors. Just make sure it matches her faceup! Use a Q tip to smear a bit on a tissue and hold it next to her face. Keep in mind the tissue starts out white and her skin has some color already.

    I would put your blank doll to the side under a cloth so the pastel dust doesn't land on her and so you don't accidentally touch her with the pastels on your fingers. Once you have mixed the pastels, put the pastel sticks AWAY. They are dirty and can get everywhere. Then wash your hands before you touch your doll. Some people wear gloves the whole time they do a faceup or blushing. I find wearing gloves makes me less aware of when I have gotten color on my fingers and I am actually more likely to smear something. I prefer to work with bare hands and wash my hands often.

    Now you get to begin applying color!! Look at where the contours of her body are. Usually you will want to apply your contour color in the dips and concave parts like the muscles of her stomach, around breasts, around knees and elbows.

    Think of the contour color like a way to add slight shadows to your doll. Look at your own hands and body in directional lighting (from one side). You will see shadows cast on your hands and the rest of your body from tendons, the distribution of fat, where bones are, and the position of muscles. Most people don't have the same body type as an Enchanted Doll, but this will give you an idea how these shapes appear to have different colors due to shadowing. Then look at the doll herself in directional lighting and see where the shadows are cast. These dolls have a lot of sculptural detail. Use the contour color to compliment it.

    I use my own body as a reference for where to add the pinker color too. I don't have rosy pink knuckles, elbows, and knees so I put less color there than some other people do. But if my doll was a redhead with very pale skin I might do that. Not all of us have the same skin color as a resin Enchanted Doll, but you may still notice some places are more pink than others. Palms of hands and bottoms of feet are usually quite pink, as are nipples and genitals (sometimes).

    These tips are for doing a "natural" color palette in my style. Your style might be different, and your doll might be different. You can experiment to get the look you want.

    Don't bother putting any color on the ball joints of the doll. These dolls are strung very tightly and sueded with hot glue. Anything you put on those balls will flake off immediately, and you will see chips. That includes the shoulders and hip balls. Sad, I know, but this is the price of resin vs. porcelain.


    You will need to do many coats to build up the pastel color. This picture is after one coat of pastel. Hardly noticeable, right?


    And this one is after two coats. You can see the color better now, but it might still look blank under different lighting.


    It took me about 6 coats of pastel to get the amount of saturation I wanted in body color, and the hands and feet took 4-5 coats after that. This is why it takes so long! I took 8 hours to do what you see here, including two breaks for food and a couple short sanity breaks (check phone, play with the dog). Don't rush yourself. It takes a lot of focus, you brain has to work hard anytime you do something new. Once I was done all I could do was just sit there and stare at the doll, I was so tired! I told my partner, Joe, I thought I had used up all the focusing neurotransmitters I had, because I couldn't concentrate on anything the whole rest of the day, lol!

    If the weather is cooler where you are, you may need even longer to give the spray more time to dry. Remember to do very light, misty coats!

    Think of spraying sealant like saving your file on a computer. When you apply pastel, it is soft and chalky. If you brush it with your finger it will come right off. That is good because it means you can use a magic eraser to undo mistakes in the current layer. But one you "save" by spraying another coat of sealant, you can't remove a mistake without removing the whole thing. You doll is still fine underneath, but you would have to undo your work. So it is good practice to check the whole doll right before you spray each time to make sure you don't accidentally "save" something like a fingerprint smudge.

    I also use dry pastels for the base fingernail color. Some people use paint, but I find the pastels are more forgiving of mistakes and look more natural. If you want her to have colored nails or tattoos you will need to use acrylic paint for that. Practice on paper first. It takes a lot of fine motor control to paint fingernails and tattoos without messing up. These nails are VERY TINY. But don't be afraid to try! As long as the doll has sealant underneath it will wipe right off.

    Assuming you are doing a natural/French manicure like me, you will need to add some white for the fingernail crescent (the long part of the nail). Here is my favorite tip I haven't seen anywhere else: You don't actually want WHITE white! If you mix a small amount of your pink blush color pastel with the white paint, to get a very pale pink, it will look more realistic. Look at your own fingernails. Sure they might look white, but compare them to a piece of printer paper. Nails are not pure white because they are slightly transparent. They show the skin color underneath. So to get a very natural looking nail, you mix in a tiny bit of the skin color. In contrast with the rest of the hand, it will still look white, it just won't stand out so much. Again, this depends on your taste.

    Making those little white fingernail crescents takes your smallest brush and a LOT of patience. I have shaky hands like a lot of people, and I am not an artist. I stabilize my arms on my knees, and the fingers of each hand against each other as I hold the hand or foot. These fingernails are seriously bitty. The lines I made here are the size of the lines I made for EYELASHES on faceups for larger dolls. As I said to Joe as I lay nearly unconscious on the floor afterwards, fingernails this small should be ILLEGAL.

    The good news is, if you mess up you can just wipe it off with your finger and try again. I also use a mini pointy q tip to clean up the edges of the white paint. Make sure you are totally happy before you save (aka seal!).



    The last step is to apply gloss to the fingernails and toenails. You can use your bitty brush for this if you want, but a slightly larger brush (the smallest one from the art store) will work fine. Don't seal over the gloss, or it won't be glossy anymore. The gloss is the last layer.

    Now you are done!
    What? Done?? But I thought I would be doing more layers for the rest of my life!!
    Yes, you are done!
    Now, you might be feeling a little bit crazy after all that. I definitely was, and I'm sure it shows LOL. Don't let that madness rush you into putting the head back on before the gloss dries. Put your beauty aside and wash your bushes and palates in the brush cleaner. Keep that stuff AWAY from your completed doll. It will take all your hard work right off, like taking off grease in one of those stove cleaning commercials!

    Once you have cleaned up, you can put her head back on and enjoy! Even an amateur blushing will make your doll look so much more lovely than before. The perfect compliment for her pretty faceup.


    Thank you all for reading. I hope you will share your tips you have found too!
    Last edited by allurose; April 4th, 2016 at 01:06 AM.
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    What a fabulous, in-depth tutorial! Thank you so much for taking the time to do this Allurose. I found it really interesting and I learnt a lot! You might call yourself an amateur but your results are anything but...she looks wonderful!

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    Quote Originally Posted by merrijane View Post
    What a fabulous, in-depth tutorial! Thank you so much for taking the time to do this Allurose. I found it really interesting and I learnt a lot! You might call yourself an amateur but your results are anything but...she looks wonderful!
    Thank you merrijane! I assure you, I am an amateur!! I have done this maybe 10 times on various dolls, that is it! That is why I felt so inspired to make a tutorial, I think it is truly not that hard to make something that looks great, and I would love to inspire more people to try it. It's so fun! I noticed many things about the sculpt of the doll that I had not paid attention to before.
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    Great tutorial, so well written! I had to research so many smaller docs to work out all those amazing tips you have captured all in one spot, big effort on your part .. Thank you!

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    Tutorial: Body Blushing, Manicure, Pedicure

    Quote Originally Posted by Dina View Post
    Great tutorial, so well written! I had to research so many smaller docs to work out all those amazing tips you have captured all in one spot, big effort on your part .. Thank you!
    Thank you Dina! The same is true for me, so much reading. And I'm sure there are still some things I missed.

    Oh actually I just remembered one, how to remove dust specks with a craft blade...I will add it in!

    Edit: I added the tip.
    Last edited by allurose; April 4th, 2016 at 01:42 AM.
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    Thank you so much for taking time and post this wonderful tutorial. All your efforts are truly appreciated. You are right that body blushing, even minimal one, brings the doll to life. Your doll looks amazing.

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    Tutorial: Body Blushing, Manicure, Pedicure

    Quote Originally Posted by Suok2011 View Post
    Thank you so much for taking time and post this wonderful tutorial. All your efforts are truly appreciated. You are right that body blushing, even minimal one, brings the doll to life. Your doll looks amazing.
    Thank you! I hope it will be useful to some people.
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    Great tutorial Allurose! It takes a lot of time and effort to make these, so thank you!

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    That was really interesting Allurose! so clear and concise, your doll looks absolutely beautiful, well done x

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