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Thread: Inspired by Marina's work

  1. #11
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    Thank you for sharing- your work is wonderful, and it's so interesting to hear how you were inspired through Marina and her beautiful dolls and see the result

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bibarina View Post
    Thank you for sharing- your work is wonderful, and it's so interesting to hear how you were inspired through Marina and her beautiful dolls and see the result
    The first time I met Marinas work, I wanted immediately to make dolls. I was extremely curious as to how the expressions she gave her dolls were so powerful. I studied FACS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facial..._Coding_System


    I became fascinated with beading, embroidery, carving, making motion-stop animation, little sculptures designing lots of different things in different mediums! Apart from the beauty and balance her dolls have, her ability to run with an idea to new horizons made a huge impression on me. I was very keen to make my own work.
    I am so in awe of folk who have followed through on their ideas and dreams. I have see that here!!

    I know that to find ones own voice one has to step back from inspirations and sources and let things incubate.
    It is lovely to return and see more dolls, more fantastic work and to pour over the pictures. Thank you Bibarina
    vimeo flickr website
    Be kind
    trying to be zen

  3. #13
    merrijane's Avatar
    merrijane is offline Adorned and bejeweled
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anna View Post
    The first time I met Marinas work, I wanted immediately to make dolls. I was extremely curious as to how the expressions she gave her dolls were so powerful. I studied FACS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facial..._Coding_System
    I always remember reading this blog entry by Marina long ago, because I think it provides a fascinating insight into how she approaches painting her doll's faces to elicit maximum emotion in the viewer.

    "Painting a doll is hands down the most rewarding part of the doll-making process.

    As usual, I set up my painting surface with a mixture of anticipation and nervousness, knowing that even after countless faces and lots of practice it’s still all too easy to fail at creating a beautiful face. In fact, I believe I’m still in need of a whole lifetime of practice.
    While the mouth is the most sensual, the eyes are the most expressive and therefore, the most important part of the face. They are a window to the soul. To create a living face, one must not paint the eyes, but the soul of the doll. To some extent, the artist paints fragments of their own soul looking through the eyes of their subjects.
    I pause in my brushwork, one of my tiny brushes balanced in my fingers while the other in my mouth, and stare unseeing into the space right in front of me, pondering what in means in the context of my work. It’s been noted by countless observes that most, if not all of my dolls have sad eyes. Just about every single media interview i’ve done up to now features the question about that. ‘What does that say about who I am?’, I ask of myself, ‘and is there a deep-seated, subconscious sadness in me, straining to escape through my doll’s eyes?’ If there is, then I don’t feel it.

    Layer 2.
    I shake off my thoughts and go back to painting, just to return to them only moments later. I’m in a philosophical mood today. My gaze wonders to the original Ruby doll sitting in front of me as my model and my mind drifts. ‘Does she really look sad?’, I ask no one in particular, straining to see sadness…..nothing. ‘She’s just not that sad to me.’-I conclude for a millionth time and reach out to pick up more paint from my pallet with the tip of my brush.

    Layer 3
    I believe that all those universally preconceived notions of artists being an emotional, sentimental mess of feelings are kind of insulting. It implies that creative people are not in control of themselves. Art may be art, but at the end of the day it is also a job. It has to be done well.
    ‘I suppose that there are some subconscious driving forces behind my doll’s seemingly consistent sad eyes, which are too internalized for me to comprehend, but there is also a very calculated reason for that.’- I repeat to myself and to my imaginary listener: ‘It’s a deliberate strategy, a manipulation in a sense, to elicit the strongest emotional responses in my audience and to steer their perception in the direction I want it to go. My personal emotional state has very little to do with it.’

    Layer 5
    I also put some extra highlights in her pupils to see if it will give her eye a new dimension or capture any other emotions not present in the other Rubys. Perhaps there is a little trace of sadness in them. Like they say: eye of the beholder.
    I believe that we are defined by what we do, and what we do is defined by who we are, but it’s impossible to say where one ends and the other begins. How far does my identity define my work, and at what point does my work begin to define me and the choices I make?
    But more importantly, are my doll’s eyes indeed sad?"

  4. #14
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    Thank you merrijane

    That is a wonderful read Merrijane. Thank you. Jeekers, I love reading Marinas, blog. Magic!
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    Be kind
    trying to be zen

  5. #15
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    Anna - Your art and little dolls as photographed and posted on the forum are neat! I think you are one of the people that followed through on your inspiration to create something of very tangible emotion! Way to go

    Merrijane - Reading this posting from Marina's blog gave me a long quiet pause. I love painting faces, any face, even my cats!! Why? Marina asks, "But more importantly, are my doll’s eyes indeed sad?" What do you think? My sons say, "Why are the dolls all so sad?". And I smile because it's a funny question. I think Marina's dolls eyes look "wet"; like they've just had a good cry and wiped their tears away and are hopeful a new path will lead to sunshine

  6. #16
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    Thank you Dollcat! I may give making little dolls another bash.
    vimeo flickr website
    Be kind
    trying to be zen

  7. #17
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    I tried to look at your pictures yesterday, alas Photobucket was down. Your sculptures are so full of energy and character. I definitely think it's something to pursue, you seem to be a natural at capturing movement and expression. I would love to be able to make my own dolls too! Marina is such an inspiration to us all.

  8. #18
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    You are very kind Leading lady. I love making figures and shied away prior to discovering Marinas work. Marina really is, wildly inspiring. I say make dolls. Just go for it!
    vimeo flickr website
    Be kind
    trying to be zen

  9. #19
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    Such awesome art - love the chandelier accent especially! It is magnificent - the emotion really is portrayed at this large scale

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by seraphicdoll View Post
    Such awesome art - love the chandelier accent especially! It is magnificent - the emotion really is portrayed at this large scale
    Thank you! it was intended as a visual pun, the gold figure reaching for her crown: at the ground level I styled it to look as though she'd powered through the earth.
    vimeo flickr website
    Be kind
    trying to be zen

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